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  1. Post
    #1

    Next Xbox codenamed "Scarlet"

    Next gen is coming!

    Spencer also confirmed that the company is working on new iterations of the Xbox console but this shouldn’t come as a big surprise. I have been told that the codename for the next series of devices is currently Scarlet but I don’t know a timeline for release at this time.
    https://www.thurrott.com/xbox/161161...eaming-service

  2. Post
    #2
    Not surprised, I fully expected both Microsoft and Sony were in full development of the next gen

  3. Post
    #3
    I doubt either company will release a traditional next gen, they'll just do incremental updates, just like every consumer device.

  4. Post
    #4
    Fact that BETH discussed next gen I am thinking announced late next year release Q1 2020.

  5. Post
    #5
    Well...yeah. The 'next' consoles are in development from the time the one preceding them is released.

  6. Post
    #6
    Valeo wrote:
    Well...yeah. The 'next' consoles are in development from the time the one preceding them is released.
    Shh that’s a secret that the masses don’t want to hear, they don’t wanna know that right after they bought their shiny ps4 that 5 is already being designed

  7. Post
    #7
    Consoles are probably going the way of phones. Decent perf for 3 years, but the super keen will update every 2 years

  8. Post
    #8
    zippy wrote:
    I doubt either company will release a traditional next gen, they'll just do incremental updates, just like every consumer device.
    Consoles are probably going the way of phones. Decent perf for 3 years, but the super keen will update every 2 years
    Disagree here, phones and mobile games in particular are far simpler in complexity and are easier to maintain over many iterations, since for the most part they don't push the phone to its full capability. After a small number of iterations, support for the 'oldest iteration' of a particular console would have to die out due to a change in engine or the sheer difference in power between devices in games that push them to their limits.

  9. Post
    #9
    True. Xbox One is what, 5 years old now? Will be maybe 6 or 7 years old by the time 'scarlet' is released. I think 4-5 years is a reasonable cycle.

    I spend more than the cost of an xbox one x every time each year on a GPU so doesn't worry me

  10. Post
    #10
    I think the last time they'll make a traditional console before moving to a service that is cloud based.

  11. Post
    #11
    HELL KNIGHT wrote:
    I think the last time they'll make a traditional console before moving to a service that is cloud based.
    Various game types that depend on latency/fast response times can't even stream across a LAN at a satisfactory level.

  12. Post
    #12
    HELL KNIGHT wrote:
    I think the last time they'll make a traditional console before moving to a service that is cloud based.
    Cloud gaming does not work unless someone is prepared to build a data centre in every city in every country costing billions yes billions because cloud gaming lives and dies on low latency the server needs to be a short distance from your house or lag will be too much and even then cloud gaming will never work for multiplayer

  13. Post
    #13
    Ahh yes like all those battlefield servers in NZ?

    I think you're probably selling the concept a little bit short. I think they will go the cloud route as well, but I think we're probably at least a couple of generations off yet (think late 2020's). And networks are far too shit in profitable places like Australia and the US (although the latter is probably getting better faster than the AU is)

  14. Post
    #14
    Well you’re gonna need like sub 10ms latency or cloud gaming is gonna feel shit nothing worse than pressing a button in an action game and the having to wait for your game to process your input because of the latency

    And from what I’ve heard all attempts at cloud gaming so far have results in things like 200 - 500ms latency fun

  15. Post
    #15
    I was thinking more around the 10 year time frame. I've seen a few gaming journalists who think it is heading that way too discuss it over the last couple of years .

    Take Windows 10 for example, Microsoft want to sell you a service that evolves now, rather than a completely new OS product every few years, and sell you subscriptions to software.

  16. Post
    #16
    That isn't really comparable to streaming interactive media content vs running it locally.

    Games are becoming more demanding performance-wise with more demand for higher framerates and minimal latency to support the competitive nature of gaming (and even without competition, simply a more responsive, enjoyable gaming experience), which is the opposite direction to which streaming of games would provide.

  17. Post
    #17
    It's all the hardware side, cloud software as a whole is pretty awesome right now but building data centres full of PC's or Consoles running games is expensive, imagine the power and air conditioning requirements and then as I said that hardware needs to be correctly scaled to minimise latency on the server side and then the connection between your house and that server needs to 1) be awesome and 2) be a short distance and lastly on your house's side you need a nice fast fibre internet connection with low latency on your side too

    And even then I'm not sure they can get latency down enough but maybe it can be done, I suspect no company that has tried cloud gaming has actually invested enough into the hardware on their side, they may not be scaling as good as it could be creating extra latency on the network for the customer

  18. Post
    #18
    HELL KNIGHT wrote:
    Your thinking of it in terms of what tech is in the market now and I'm talking about in the next decade.

    Take 4G for example, you wouldn't generally try to game with that as it has a latency of 50ms. 5G however has latency of 1ms and can do 10Gbps and we will also have 10Gbps fibre here in the next few years.
    And what will the rest of the world have? Do you think the majority of the US users are going to have 1ms latency 10 years from now?

    10 years is not a long time at all, and its safe to say the majority of the world's network infrastructure is unlikely to have been replaced in that time.

    As mentioned earlier, even streaming games over a LAN isn't suitable for fast-paced games, and that is already incredibly low latency/high speed.

  19. Post
    #19
    NZ might have great internet, but I doubt most of America will come close to what we have, its a large country and they are not investing as much into infrastructure as they should - Countries in Europe, Asia and now NZ have the best internet. America, Africa and Australia is poverty tier internet

    DW wrote:
    And what will the rest of the world have? Do you think the majority of the US users are going to have 1ms latency 10 years from now?

    10 years is not a long time at all, and its safe to say the majority of the world's network infrastructure is unlikely to have been replaced in that time.

    As mentioned earlier, even streaming games over a LAN isn't suitable for fast-paced games, and that is already incredibly low latency/high speed.

    Keen to hear more about the LAN issue you mention - I would have thought LAN should be great, you get 0ms latency and what, like 1000mb+ connection speed right? - if its still laggy I imagine its the server/host at fault?

  20. Post
    #20
    SirGrim wrote:
    NZ might have great internet, but I doubt most of America will come close to what we have, its a large country and they are not investing as much into infrastructure as they should - Countries in Europe, Asia and now NZ have the best internet. America, Africa and Australia is poverty tier internet




    Keen to hear more about the LAN issue you mention - I would have thought LAN should be great, you get 0ms latency and what, like 1000mb+ connection speed right? - if its still laggy I imagine its the server/host at fault?
    I read of plenty of people unhappy trying to play FPS games with the likes of Steam Link when I researched it as an option for my house a while back.

  21. Post
    #21
    Yes, the US will. Here is just a couple of examples: Verzion is aiming to start fibre replacement with it this year or next. T-Mobile is rolling it out to 30 cities there now and looking to start using it next year.

    10Gbps fibre is being tested here now.

    5G is needed for the internet of things and self driving cars. You're more likely to see it as a home connection first, instead of a mobile connection, because of how it works.

    Sure it will likely be 10 years before it has the global coverage that 4G has now, but it will also likely be doing 20Gbps down and 10Gbps up by then - so 20 times faster than your current average LAN connection.

  22. Post
    #22
    HELL KNIGHT wrote:
    Yes, the US will. Here is just a couple of examples: Verzion is aiming to start fibre replacement with it this year or next. T-Mobile is rolling it out to 30 cities there now and looking to start using it next year.

    10Gbps fibre is being tested here now.

    5G is needed for the internet of things and self driving cars. You're more likely to see it as a home connection first, instead of a mobile connection, because of how it works.

    Sure it will likely be 10 years before it has the global coverage that 4G has now, but it will also likely be doing 20Gbps down and 10Gbps up by then - so 20 times faster than your current average LAN connection.
    30 cities? wow, America isn't small like NZ - they currently have 35000 towns/cities

    Keen for some 5g though - not so keen for the battery draw, 5g needs 4 antennas in your phone meaning that battery drains real, 0-100 real quick

  23. Post
    #23
    That is just the start of their rollout now, not 10 years from now...

    Did you also miss the part about it being more likely to be a home connection first.

    Sprint there said this:
    Since the company is using Massive MIMO antennas to deliver 5G, it’s promising that customers in these markets should begin seeing massive speed increases in April 2018, even while using 4G devices.

    Like the other carriers, Sprint will use LTE as the network backbone with 5G picking up in areas with coverage. While Sprint expects to roll out its service to these six markets in 2018 as 5G capable devices come to market, the company promises a national rollout in 2019.
    Last edited by HELL KNIGHT; 13th June 2018 at 10:05 am.

  24. Post
    #24
    That latency is only from the device to the receiver of the signal, any data still has to traverse the internet to whatever servers are performing the computing. So yes 5G will only add a small amount of additional latency, but you're still bound by the latency of the underlying internet.

  25. Post
    #25
    2020 according to the source who leaked the codename
    https://www.resetera.com/threads/bra...in-2020.48524/

    Claims we could see multiple devices announced. I wonder if MS will do two models? A base model i e one s and a pro model i.e 1x.
    Last edited by Valeyard; 13th June 2018 at 10:32 pm.